Sunday, November 25, 2007

The Kerala Tales, Part Two



One morning early in our holiday I woke at six, unable to get used to the new timezone. I wandered down to the beach and watched the fishermen cast their nets into the bay and then spend the next two hours hauling them in. Their patience and skill was captivating. Their weather-beaten faces showed that they had been doing this all their lives and several were even missing hands (lost to fishing lines over the years, maybe?). As many as about 50 men worked together for a catch which one local told me would only fetch around 500 rupees at the market (about six pounds sterling). It's no wonder most of the town are turning to tourism to make their money. This is the way traditional trades and crafts are lost, all over the world.












The early bird catches the fish.


I spotted this guy at one point. Clearly white (with a painfully pale complexion and the sun damage to show for it) I wondered what his story was. What was he doing working side by side with all these local Muslim fishermen? Maybe I have inadvertently stumbled upon Lord Lucan, who knows...

2 comments:

Helô said...

Welcome back! Thanks for sharing such beautiful pictures. They reminded me of Sebastião Salgado's work.
big hug

Anne-Marie Weeden said...

Thanks Helo! Salgado is one of my favourite photographers so I am very flattered. I can't wait to see his new book on Africa...

Hope you are well. x